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Other Changes

On 1 March 2021, the new Body Corporate and Community Management (Standard Module) Regulation comes into force. The new regulation clarifies and adds provisions to the existing regulation to provide for more flexible and contemporary arrangements within body corporates. The changes are split into three categories – Committees, General Meetings, and Other. In this article, being the third of a three part series, the others changes to the module are explained.  

General Meetings

On 1 March 2021, the new Body Corporate and Community Management (Standard Module) Regulation comes into force. The new regulation clarifies and adds provisions to the existing regulation to provide for more flexible and contemporary arrangements within body corporates. The changes are split into three categories – Committees, General Meetings, and Other. In this article, being the second of a three part series, the changes being made to general meetings are explained.

Committees

On 1 March 2021, the new Body Corporate and Community Management (Standard Module) Regulation comes into force. The new regulation clarifies and adds provisions to the existing regulation to provide for more flexible and contemporary arrangements within body corporates. The changes are split into three categories – Committees, General Meetings, and Other. In this article, the changes being made to committees are explained.

Person entering pin code on ATM machine

In the recent case of Testa v Fields, the court, while making a decision about the best interests of a child, addressed concerns of family violence by the father to the mother. The court accepted that by denying the mother access to their bank accounts, he was financially abusing the mother. The court labelled this as controlling conduct. The father also cut the gas and electrical connections to the granny flat where the mother was living.

Last Will & Testament

“I have not seen my child in 20 years, why should I give him anything in my will?” Most people would think that they should be entitled to leave their estate to whomever they wish when they die, or indeed make whatever charitable requests they choose. Whilst as a general principle that proposition is true, there are some significant exceptions that need to be acknowledged in making a will. 

  A recent case[1] between a husband (Mr Scarffe) and a wife (Ms Obannon) who had recently separated, shows how family law proceedings can play out across two different countries. The Scarffe & Obannon case The couple had been living together in Australia since 1997. They married in 2014 and in the same year relocated to Singapore with their three children. The couple then separated in 2016, and the husband moved back to Australia in 2018 while the rest of the family stayed in Singapore. In 2019, the wife started legal proceedings in Singapore against her husband, where she filed… Continue Reading

The Queensland Government recently passed the Justice Legislation (COVID-19 Emergency Response – Document and Oaths) Regulation 2020.  The purpose of the legislation is to address the issue of physically witnessing and signing documents amidst the social distancing restrictions that are currently in place as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Queensland Government has now enacted the Retail Shop Leases and Other Commercial Leases (COVID-19 Emergency Response) Regulation 2020 (referred to in this update as the “Regulations“), which was expected to legislate for the State of Queensland the National Cabinet’s ‘Mandatory Code of Conduct – SME Commercial Leasing Principles During COVID-19’ (referred to in this update as the “National Cabinet Code“).

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